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The Shocking News in the Unemployment Report

The Shocking News in the Unemployment Report | Simplifying The Market

Last Friday, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics released their May Employment Situation Summary. Leading up to the release, most experts predicted the unemployment rate would jump up to approximately 20% from the 14.7% rate announced last month.

The experts were shocked.

The Wall Street Journal put it this way:

“The May U.S. jobless rate fell to 13.3% and employers added 2.5 million jobs, blowing Wall Street expectations out of the water: Economists had forecast a loss of 8.3 million jobs and a 19.5% unemployment rate.”

In addition, CNBC revealed:

“The May gain was by far the biggest one-month jobs surge in U.S. history since at least 1939.”

Here are some of the job gains by sector:

  • Food Service and Bartenders – 1,400,000
  • Construction – 464,000
  • Education and Health Services – 424,000
  • Retail – 368,000
  • Other Services – 272,000
  • Manufacturing – 225,000
  • Professional Services – 127,000

There’s still a long way to go before the economy fully recovers, as 21 million Americans remain unemployed. That number is down, however, from 23 million just last month. And, of the 21 million in the current report, 73% feel their layoff is temporary. This aligns with a recent Federal Reserve Bank report that showed employers felt 75% of the job losses are temporary layoffs and furloughs.

The Employment Situation Summary was definitely a pleasant surprise, and evidence that the country’s economic turnaround is underway. The data also offers a labor-market snapshot from mid-May, when the government conducted its monthly survey of households and businesses. Many states did not open for business until the second half of May. This bodes well for next month’s jobs report.

Bottom Line

We cannot rejoice over a report that reveals millions of American families are still without work. We can, however, feel relieved that we are headed in the right direction, and much more quickly than most anticipated.

Note: In its original report, the BLS explained that a misclassification error could have occurred over the last 3 months, starting in March of 2020. Readjusting for this error, the unemployment rate would actually show a drop from 19.7% in April to 16.3% in May. Nobody would say the original report of 13.3% unemployment was a good number, nor is the revised 16.3%. What is a positive move for our country and the economy is the significant drop in the rate from April to May, meaning more people are getting jobs than losing them. That’s the key takeaway.

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National Homeownership Month [INFOGRAPHIC]

National Homeownership Month [INFOGRAPHIC] | Simplifying The Market

National Homeownership Month [INFOGRAPHIC] | Simplifying The Market

Some Highlights

  • National Homeownership Month is a great time to reflect on how we can each promote stronger community growth.
  • Homeownership helps families build financial freedom, find greater happiness and satisfaction, and make a positive impact on our local communities.
  • Let’s connect today if homeownership is part of your future plans.
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Three Things to Understand About Unemployment Statistics

Three Things to Understand About Unemployment Statistics | Simplifying The Market

Tomorrow morning the Bureau of Labor Statistics will release the latest Employment Situation Summary, which will include the most current unemployment rate. It will be a horrific number. Many analysts believe unemployment could be greater than 20%. These numbers represent families across the nation that are not sure when (or if) they will return to work. The emotional impact on these households is devastating.

There are, however, some small rays of light shining through on this issue. Here are three:

1. The actual number of unemployed is less than many are reporting

The number of people unemployed is sometimes over-exaggerated. It seems that every newscaster talks about the 40+ million people “currently” unemployed. It is true that, over the last ten weeks, over 40.7 million people have applied for unemployment. It is also true, however, that many of those people have already returned to work or gotten a new job. The actual number of people currently unemployed is 21.1 million. This is still a horrible number, but about half of what is often being reported.Three Things to Understand About Unemployment Statistics | Simplifying The Market

2. Of those still unemployed, most are temporary layoffs

Last month’s unemployment report showed that 90% of those unemployed believe their status is temporary. Friday’s report will probably show a decline in that percentage as the original number was somewhat optimistic. However, a recent survey by the Federal Reserve Bank showed that employers believe over 75% of job losses are temporary layoffs and furloughs. This means 3 out of 4 people should be returning to work as the economy continues to recover.

3. Those on unemployment are receiving assistance

According to a recent study from the Becker Friedman Institute for Economics at the University of Chicago, 68% of those who are eligible for unemployment insurance receive benefits that exceed lost earnings, with 20% receiving benefits at least twice as large as their lost earnings.

Bottom Line

Tomorrow’s report will be difficult to digest. However, as the nation continues to reopen, many of those families who are impacted will be able to return to work.

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About Mortgages: 2020

A survey of 200 mortgage lending professionals showed that nearly two in three mortgage lending professionals expect mortgage purchase production to increase, according to Lenders One Mortgage Barometer.

The overall anticipated increase for 2019 is set at 11%. In addition, 87% of mortgage professionals believe the mortgage purchase market will be somewhat to extremely active.

The survey was conducted online to a random 200 mortgage lenders, and independent research was also conducted by Market Intel Group in January, where it showed that 79% of millennials, are now reaching the peak age for home buying

Lenders One is a national alliance of independent mortgage bankers, correspondent lenders.

Featured Posts, Real Estate

Home Buyer: Approved!

Once again the voices of the REALTORS® were heard loud and clear on Capitol Hill, and we scored a big win for future homeowners! Thanks to the more than 139,000 REALTORS®,

or 15% of our members, across the nation, the Housing Opportunity through Modernization Act of 2016, or H.R. 3700, passed the U.S. Senate by unanimous consent, and was signed into law

by President Obama on July 29, 2016. 

This legislation:

          1. Solves a number of concerns regarding FHA’s condo rules:Reduces the FHA condo owner occupancy ratio to 35%, unless FHA takes alternative action within 90 days.

          2. Directs FHA to streamline the condo re-certification process.Provides more flexibility for mixed use buildings.Mirrors the Federal Housing Finance Agency’s (FHFA) rules regarding private transfer fees for FHA condo lending.

          3. Provides permanent authority for direct endorsement for approved lenders to approve Rural Housing Service (RHS) loans.

          4. Makes reforms to federally assisted housing programs to streamline the programs.

On behalf of the NAR Leadership Team, we would like to thank you and your colleagues for this amazing grassroots effort and for all your support for this national Call for Action. 

Our state and local association partners did a great job in leading the efforts to get the U.S. Senate to act on this critical legislation.   This victory was made possible by the collective efforts of the

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®, and our state and local association partners. When REALTORS® speak in a single unified voice, Congress listens.

 

Should you have a comment, questions or inquiries just reach us 714.493.2657 or email us at  jflores@homeloansondemand.

We are here for you, every step of the way!

Featured Posts, Real Estate

Home Sales Rebounded Sharply!

There is a lot of upbeat news in the September 2016 existing home sales report released by the National Association of Realtors® (NAR) on Thursday.

Sales rebounded sharply and the improvement was seen in all four regions.  More good news, NAR attributed part of that to increased participation from first-time home-buyers, a group that has worried the housing industry by its relative absence.

Total existing home sales during the month, including single-family homes, town homes, condos, and co-ops, rose 3.2 percent to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.47 million.  First-time buyers accounted for 34 percent of sales, the highest portion in more than four years.

Should you have a comment, questions or inquiries just reach us 714.493.2657 or email it us at:  jflores@homeloansondemand.

We are here for you, every step of the way!

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5 things to know before purchasing your first home

By, Jesus Flores, Loan Officer

Buying your first home is a big investment – one that can affect your lifestyle and your credit. The more information gathering you do before making your decision, the greater your satisfaction is likely to be before, during and after your move. To get you started, here are 5 things to know before buying your first home.

How much you can afford: Consider all costs involved, including the down payment, closing costs, your monthly mortgage payment, taxes and maintenance, insurance and any applicable association fees.

Your credit score: Credit is an agreement to borrow money with the promise that you will pay it back later through scheduled payments. Good credit may get you a lower rate on your loan. To learn about credit and how to get your score.

Your financing options: Rates, terms, discount points and other details vary by loan type and with your credit. If you’re ready to take the next steps, find out what’s available to you. .

The right real estate agent for you: Real estate agents specialize in a variety of areas and are each familiar with different neighborhoods.  Choose one who you feel best aligns with  your needs and personal preferences.

The neighborhood: Safety, commute times, noise and other surrounding factors can influence your quality of life. Make sure you visit the area, walk around the neighborhood and get a feel for the community. Take the time to research the community online to learn of any upcoming developments that may impact the housing market in that area, and look for other red flags that may impact your choice to live there.

Ready to get started? Find out more about your financing options, the home-buying process and what you can afford by contacting us at 714.493.2657

Featured Posts, FHA, Loans, Mortgage, Rates, Refinance, Refinancing

Loan Origination Fees Vs Discount Points

When taking out a mortgage, you probably were considering buying discount points whether for a new purchase or to refinance an existing loan, one decision you’ll undoubtedly will have, is to   make sure it’s worth paying discount points to obtain a certain interest rate on your mortgage.

Before going any further, it’s important to note that the term “points” gets thrown around loosely, and can refer to the loan origination fee and/or discount points. The loan origination fee is the commission charged by the bank or the loan officer for working on your loan, where on the other hand discount points are used to buy down your interest rate.

It’s an important distinction because the loan origination fee pays for the costs of originating the mortgage and these fees involves:

  • Paperwork
  • Verification’s
  • Calculations done to determine your mortgage rate

Finally, it is important to know that a good credit score may help you get a lower origination fee, and an excellent credit score can be an even better bargaining tool in your negotiations.

While paying discount points (prepaid interest) is entirely optional depending on the rate you desire. Discount points are a one-time, upfront mortgage closing cost which give a mortgage borrower access to “discounted” mortgage rates as compared to the market.  

We at Home Loans On Demand are devoted to your real estate financing needs as we partner to assure you receive only the best home-loan solution specifically suited to your financing and lifestyle needs

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my credit score

What is a credit score?

A credit score is a statistical measurement used to predict how likely you are to repay a loan. The score is drawn from information on your credit report and data from millions of consumers. It provides lenders with a fast, objective way to evaluate your credit history.

What factors influence my credit score?

Any action you take related to your credit practices influences your credit score, from timely, regular monthly payments (which will have a positive influence) to minimum payments on maximum credit card balances (which will have a negative influence).

What is a good credit score?

Credit scores typically range from 300 to 850. A credit score that falls between 680 and 850 is considered more favorable and a lesser credit risk.

Can I change my credit score?

Yes – in fact, you are the only person who can change it. You can improve your score by paying off loans, reducing credit card balances and making monthly payments on time. After a period of time, generally a year or two, such practices will usually be reflected in your credit score.

Does a lender take anything else into consideration when I apply for a loan?

Yes. Although lenders rely heavily on credit scores, other factors are taken into consideration, including your job history, income, savings and checking accounts, the types of loans you currently have and the type of mortgage loan you want.

What can I do if I don’t have credit?

If you don’t have credit as reported by the credit-reporting agencies, most lenders will accept alternative sources of credit. This could include “credit references” in the form of bills you have paid on a regular basis for rent, utilities, cable TV or insurance.

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what you should know about your credit

By, Jesus Flores, Loan Officer

Owning a home is one of the most single important decisions we make in our lifetime. However, one critical element for realizing this dream is developing and maintaining good credit.

Although credit simply means you are using someone else’s money to pay for a purchase with a promise to pay that money back, it will help you obtain a loan when you want one, with favorable terms, and it also gives you more control when shopping for loans.

Why not pay with cash?

Paying cash for smaller items, such as clothing and groceries, is generally a good idea. However, using credit cards for larger purchases, such as appliances, can help you establish the good credit history that will help when it comes time to make even larger purchases, such as cars and homes. But remember: your credit is only as good as how well – and on time – you pay your monthly debts.

Does it matter how many credit cards I have?

Yes. Having numerous credit card accounts open, even if the accounts have low or zero balances, may affect your ability to get a loan. This is because a potential lender considers all available credit limits – not just debts – when deciding if you would be a good credit risk.

What happens if I don’t make timely payments?

Each time you make a payment after its due date, you may have to pay penalties or late fees. In addition, a history of making late payments may affect your credit history and ultimately mean higher interest rates on subsequent loans.  

What is considered a late payment?

Generally, a payment is considered delinquent if it’s received 30 days past its due date. A mortgage payment, however, is considered late when it’s received 15 days after its due date. If an account has payments that are 60 or 90 days late, that account is considered to be in serious delinquency. Any late rent or mortgage payments in the past 12 months could affect your qualification for a mortgage loan and its interest rate.

A typical credit report is made up of four types of data: personal information, credit information, public record information and inquiries about your credit. Credit information includes details for all loans and lines of credit: the date it was opened, the credit limit or loan amount, the total balance and the monthly payment amount. The report also shows your payment history over the past several years and the names of anyone else responsible for paying an account, such as a spouse or a co-signer.